Category Archives: Author Influences

Author Influences with KA Richardson

It’s Wednesday which means it’s time for another Author Influences and today I’m delighted to welcome crime and thriller writer KA Richardson to the blog. So let’s find out about the books and authors that have inspired her and her work.

Which authors/books did you like to read as a child?
Pretty much anything I could devour – I loved Enid Blyton, and moved rapidly onto Nancy Drew and the Hardy Boys – also the Willard Price adventures. When I turned double figures I enjoyed Point Horror books and in my early teens moved onto adult crime novels.

Were you good at English at school? Did you like it?
English was one of my top subjects at school – I always got good grades and enjoyed the reading material – even Shakespeare! My favourite book I read whilst at school was Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck. It was the first book I remember reading that made me cry.

What genres do you like to read? Have they had an impact on the genre you write?
I enjoy a wide diversity of genres however tend to read more crime and romantic suspense than anything else. They probably have impacted on my writing in some ways – but so has the jobs I’ve had – I worked as a CSI for years and still work for the police albeit in an alternate role now. Due to these jobs, I find it easy to focus on the forensic side of an investigation.

If you were to write a different genre what would it be and why?
I’ve started a supernatural trilogy which I’m loving writing – it frees you of restraints and lets you write what you like without having to be too influenced by ‘is this procedure right’ or ‘would a cop really do that’.

Did any author’s work encourage you to pick up your pen and write and if so who, what and why?
So many!! I read Stephen King’s book, On Writing and it was honestly one of the best and most refreshing books about writing I’ve ever read. It’s inspiring and from the king of horror and much of it resonated with me. Other’s that have inspired me though are Karen Rose – she’s a fantastic author who writes romantic suspense and I love how her characters bring the book to life. She’s also been disadvantaged through life in some ways with her disability which makes her writing even better and deeper as she often focuses on people with some form of disability.

Are there any authors who, as soon as they publish a new book, you have to get it?
Karen Rose for sure – and Mo Hayder.

Which books have you read that have made you think ’Wow, I wish I had written that’ and what was it about the book?
Mo Hayder’s book The Treatment. I absolutely love the wandering man character and would have loved to have written him! Also it’s so deliciously dark and terrifying that it had me checking the doors and windows before I went to bed!

Have any of your plots/characters been influenced by real life events/people? (Be careful, I don’t want you getting sued!)
I think all characters have some elements taken from people you know – or people you see in the street etc. None of my characters are based on actual people but definitely a little of certain people may feature in many of them.

A huge thank you for taking part. I totally agree with you on Mo Hayder, she is fantastic!

KA Richardson’s latest book Watch You Burn is out now and here is what it’s about:

Someone is breaking into Fire Investigator, Edina Blaze’s, home and leaving deadly messages. When Glen Peacock is burned alive, she has to put her own problems aside and attend the location with Crime Scene Manager, Kevin Lang.
As the body count rises, Edina’s sister Heather becomes involved. Is it her setting these gruesome fires? Or is she a target too?
Kevin has seen it all in his years on the force, but when a young girl is found burnt to death, even he is shocked.
Who is taking pleasure in watching people burn? Why are they doing it? And will they be caught?

DI Alistair McKay and the team from North East Police have to work quickly to stop the killer, before they all end up in flames.

About KA Richardson

KA Richardson is the author of the North East Police series – there are four out in the series so far, the most recent of which is Watch You Burn. This was published in May 2017 and features the Fire Investigation Team. KA Richardson finished her Ma Creative Writing in 2011 and has been focusing on publication ever since. She is privileged to have had two publishers – Caffeine Nights (for her first novel) and now Bloodhound Books for the rest in the series.
Website: www.kerryannrichardson.com
Twitter: @kerryann77 or @karichardson77
Facebook: KA Richardson
Instagram: @kerryann77

Author Influences with Alex Walters

For this week’s Author Influences I’m delighted to be joined by crime and thriller writer Alex Walters.

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Which authors/books did you like to read as a child?
A lot of Enid Blyton – still think she’s a brilliant writer for children. Then, as a teenager, people like Alan Garner, a lot of science fiction, then discovered Agatha Christie and crime fiction…

Were you good at English at school? Did you like it?
It was my best and favourite subject – went on to study English Literature at university.

What genres do you like to read? Have they had an impact on the genre you write?
I read anything and everything, really, though probably more crime fiction than anything else. There are a few writers I’d cite as direct influences but I think the impact is mostly about trying to learn from the best.

If you were to write a different genre what would it be and why?
I’ve mainly written various forms of police procedural to date (though often with a twist or two), so I think I’d be most likely to explore other areas of crime fiction or thrillers. I’ve also written some supernatural fiction and would quite like to do more in the area.

Did any author’s work encourage you to pick up your pen and write and if so who, what and why?
As a teenager, the writers who made me want to write myself were people like Alan Garner and various science fiction writers, like Samuel R Delany. They made me excited about what it was possible to do with words.

Are there any authors who, as soon as they publish a new book, you have to get it?
It used to be Reginald Hill, author of the Dalziel and Pascoe series, who’s sadly no longer with us. Now I’m struggling to keep up with the books I’ve already bought!

Which books have you read that have made you think ’Wow, I wish I had written that’ and what was it about the book?
Reginald Hill’s The Wood Beyond (and various others) – ingenious plotting, three-dimensional characters, witty writing, and addressing important issues. Various Ruth Rendells for the same reasons.

Have any of your plots/characters been influenced by real life events/people? (Be careful, I don’t want you getting sued!)
The influence is usually indirect – some real life event which sits in the back of my brain until it sprouts into something rather different in a story. One of my books starts with a real life event which I shifted from Stockport to Mongolia. And my current series set in the Scottish Black Isle uses mainly real locations, with the first book, Candles and Roses, featuring a walk-on part from a real person (with his permission!).

A huge thank you Alex for taking part.

Alex’s latest book Dark Corners was published on 9 December 2016 and is the second in the DCI Kenny Murrain novel. Check out all of Alex’s books on his Amazon page HERE.

About Alex Walters

Alex Walters has worked in the oil industry, broadcasting and banking and now works as a consultant mainly in the criminal justice sector including police, prisons and probation. As Michael Walters, he published three crime thrillers set in modern-day Mongolia, which are now being re-published as Alex Walters in new, re-edited versions. As Alex Walters he has written two thrillers set in and around Manchester and featuring the undercover officer, Marie Donovan, Trust No-One and Nowhere to Hide, and two books Late Checkout and Dark Corners featuring, alongside Marie Donovan, the distinctive DCI Kenny Murrain. Alex is also the author of Candles and Roses, the first in a new crime series set in Scotland’s Black Isle. The second in the series will be published in September 2017.

Alex currently lives in Manchester with his wife, occasional sons and too many cats.

He can be contacted at:
Twitter: @mikewalters60
Facebook: www.facebook.com/alexwaltersauthor/

Author Influences with H.A. Leuschel

Welcome to another edition of Author Influences. This week I am delighted to be joined by H.A. Leuschel whose book Manipulated Lives I reviewed earlier this year.

Which authors/books did you like to read as a child?
I grew up in a multi-lingual environment, so I’d have to name three main authors that I enjoyed reading as a child. Enid Blyton’s books were at the top of the list. The Famous Five was my favourite series. I loved the idea of being fearless, going on adventures without adults’ supervision, boys and girls equally capable of fending for themselves.

Being an identical twin myself, I was also a keen reader of the The Twins at St. Clare’s, called Hanni und Nanni in the German translation. My sister and I could totally relate to the girls and the stories always made us laugh. We usually got two books at birthdays, so that we’d not squabble over who got to read a new book first!

As a third book series, I’d have to mention the Martine picture books by the Belgian author and illustrator Marcel Marlier & Gilbert Delahaye. The main character gets to go places, learns to swim, cook and dance and most of all, she learns to conquer her fears. As much as I find the series a bit stereotypical now, Martine conveyed a curiosity and an eagerness to learn which are universal traits in children I’d say.

Were you good at English at school? Did you like it?
As a toddler, I went to French kindergarten, then went to a German primary and secondary school where I was taught French and English as well as a spattering of Dutch. I love languages and was always keen to scribble, read and write in any of them.

What genres do you like to read? Have they had an impact on the genre you write?
I would say that I enjoy a wide variety of genres, it really depends on my mood but my favourite fiction genres are literary fiction and psychological thrillers. I also read nonfiction, especially related to philosophy, psychology or the natural sciences. It’s the thought-provoking idea in a text that will catch my attention and maybe spark a new idea for my writing.

If you were to write a different genre what would it be and why?
I’m hugely intrigued by the studies of the mind and often find myself perusing articles about the latest developments in Artificial Intelligence. I think writing a novel with a Sci-Fi angle would be tempting.

Did any author’s work encourage you to pick up your pen and write and if so who, what and why?
Simone de Beauvoir has had a huge impact on me as a teenager and well into my twenties and thirties. She’s the only author whose books I can read again and again. I’ve read all of her writings – fiction and non-fiction alike but if there is one of them that I’d highly recommend to every reader, it would have to be A Very Easy Death. In this short book, she tenderly and with shocking clarity recounts the last phase in her mother’s life. It’s so simple yet poignant, moving and very powerful in its message. The author shows with great honesty that when facing the death of a parent, emotions can not only take you by surprise but over-ride the urge to rationalize the process of dying.

Are there any authors who, as soon as they publish a new book, you have to get it?
That’s a difficult one. I think a book needs to fit with my current mood, so anything can attract my attention for different reasons. Having said that, I’d always be keen to read another of Margaret Atwood’s novels, the next Isabel Dalhousie instalment in Alexander Smith McCall’s series or check out the latest book by Ian McEwan.

Which books have you read that have made you think ’Wow, I wish I had written that’ and what was it about the book?
The books I most enjoy offer a mix of suspense, mystery, depth of character and a setting that mirrors the psychology of its protagonists. To name just a few, I had a big ‘wow’ moment with The Bird Tribunal (Agnes Ravatn), The Fifth Child (Doris Lessing), The Road (Cormac McCarthy), The Mandarins (Simone de Beauvoir), Burial Rites (Hannah Kent), The Bastard of Istanbul (Elif Shafak) … but to be honest the list is so much longer than this!

Have any of your plots/characters been influenced by real life events/people? (Be careful, I don’t want you getting sued!)
Manipulated Lives is my first published work of fiction and it is a collection of five novellas where I explore the core theme of psychological manipulation from five different perspectives. Each story aims to highlight to what extent abusive manipulation can distort lives and threaten a person’s feeling of self-worth.

Personal tragic circumstances and the completion of a couple of creative writing courses with the OU and Oxford University had made me pick up the pen, then transfer my ideas into the writing of this collection of novellas as well as fulfil my long-term dream of becoming an author.

A huge thank you for taking part and for the wonderful responses.

Manipulated Lives is out now (you can read my review HERE). Here is what it is about:

Five stories – Five Lives
Have you ever felt confused or at a loss for words in front of a spouse, colleague or parent, to the extent that you have felt inadequate or, worse, a failure? Do you ever wonder why someone close to you seems to endure humiliation without resistance?

Manipulators are everywhere. At first these devious and calculating people can be hard to spot, because that is their way. They are often masters of disguise: witty, disarming, even charming in public – tricks to snare their prey – but then they revert to their true self of being controlling and angry in private. Their main aim: to dominate and use others to satisfy their needs, with a complete lack of compassion and empathy for their victim.

In this collection of short novellas, you meet people like you and me, intent on living happy lives, yet each of them, in one way or another, is caught up and damaged by a manipulative individual. First you meet Tess, whose past is haunted by a wrong decision, then young, successful and well balanced Sophie, who is drawn into the life of a little boy and his troubled father. Next, there is teenage Holly, who is intent on making a better life for herself, followed by a manipulator himself, trying to make sense of his irreversible incarceration. Lastly, there is Lisa, who has to face a parent’s biggest regret. All stories highlight to what extent abusive manipulation can distort lives and threaten our very feeling of self-worth.

About H.A Leuschel

Helene grew up in Belgium where she gained a Licentiate in Journalism & Communication, which led to a career in radio and television in Brussels, London and Edinburgh.
She now lives with her husband and two children in Portugal and recently acquired a Master of Philosophy with the OU, deepening her passion for the study of the mind.
When she is not writing, Helene works as a freelance journalist and teaches Yoga.

For more information about the author and her upcoming books, please visit
Website: www.heleneleuschel.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/HALeuschel
Facebook: www.facebook.com/HALeuschel
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/15337013.H_A_Leuschel

 

Author Influences With Tony J Forder

After a break last week (mainly due to me being disorganised!) Author Influences is back this week and I’m really pleased to be joined by Tony J Forder!

Which authors/books did you like to read as a child?
Enid Blyton, Richmal Crompton and Anthony Buckeridge were early favourites, soon followed by both Alan Garner and Paul Gallico as I got a little older.

Were you good at English at school? Did you like it?
Other than art it was my favourite subject, and it was also my best subject – especially composition.

What genres do you like to read? Have they had an impact on the genre you write?
I read crime, thrillers, espionage. I also still enjoy fantasy. The crime/thriller genre has had a massive influence as it is what I now choose to write. All of my potential storylines reflect this genre.

If you were to write a different genre what would it be and why?
Fantasy – I began writing in that genre, but feel I am now experienced enough to pull it off rather than be derivative. I’d like the freedom it provides, allowing me to make up anything I like and know that readers can’t pick it apart for authenticity.

Did any author’s work encourage you to pick up your pen and write and if so who, what and why?
Alan Garner – The Weirdstone of Brisingamen was the first fantasy novel I ever read, and it both captivated me and freed my imagination. I started writing almost immediately after finishing that book. Although I have strayed from the genre, it opened doors inside my head – doors I hadn’t even known existed.

Are there any authors who, as soon as they publish a new book, you have to get it?
Michael Connelly – in my view simply the best crime novelist on the planet. Also people like Robert Crais, Lee Child, Mark Greaney and, in recent years, Mason Cross.

Which books have you read that have made you think ’Wow, I wish I had written that’ and what was it about the book?
The Silence of the Lambs for its razor-sharp prose and characterisation; A Christmas Carol for the author’s ability to find something majestic in minutiae; The Poet for its plotting.

Have any of your plots/characters been influenced by real life events/people? (Be careful, I don’t want you getting sued!)
Something I have just started writing is somewhat influenced by two old murder cases I was reading about – unsolved murders at that. I can’t say more than that, but suffice to say either would have been a fine plot, but throwing the two together into the same pot intrigues the hell out of me. My characters are often an amalgalm of people I know or have met, and one of them is more than a little autobiographical.

A huge thank you for taking part and for the great answers.
An equally huge thank you for allowing me to – it is greatly appreciated.

Tony’s current novel Bad to the Bone is out now. Here’s what it is about:

A skeletal body is unearthed in a wooded area of Peterborough, Cambridgeshire. DI James Bliss, together with DC Penny Chandler, investigate the case and discover that the young, female victim had been relocated from its original burial site.

A witness is convinced that a young female was struck by a vehicle back in the summer of 1990, and that police attended the scene. However, no record exists of either the accident or the reported victim. As the case develops, two retired police officers are murdered. The two are linked with others who were on duty at the time a road accident was reported.

As Bliss and Chandler delve deeper into the investigation, they start to question whether senior officers may have been involved in the murder of the young women who was buried in the woods.

As each link in the chain is put under duress, so is Bliss who clashes with superiors and the media.

When his team receives targeted warnings, Bliss will need to decide whether to drop the case or to pursue those responsible.

Will Bliss walk away in order to keep his career intact or will he fight no matter what the cost?

And is it possible the killer is much closer than they imagined?

About Tony J Forder

Long ago, back in the mists of time, when I was filled with ambition and brimming with ideas, I wrote a short story for a national competition. The competition was judged by an editor from Pan Books, who liked it enough to choose it as the winner, and to also publish my work in the forthcoming Dark Voices series, which had replaced the famous Pan Book of Horror Stories. And so it was that Gino’s Bar and Grille became my first published piece, in Dark Voices II.

Over a short period, three more stories of mine were published: Character Role, in Fear magazine; A Grim Story, in Rattler’s Tales; and then Book End, my second story for Pan in Dark Voices IV.

Following a conversation with author Brian Lumley, at a book signing for Dark Voices II, I began to feel as if I belonged amongst the writing fraternity. I also started to think that maybe, just maybe, I had a novel in me.

What followed were two horror/dark fantasy novels of moderate quality. But, I told myself, I am learning my craft. The first book of mine I even came close to liking was Degrees of Darkness, and I delighted in scaring the crap out of friends and family who read it. A follow-up never really saw the light of day.

On 1st February 2017, Bloodhound Books announced they had signed me to their stable of writers. On Saturday 29 April they will release Bad to the Bone. Bloodhound have also signed me to write a second title in the series.

With Degrees of Darkness also due to be published later in 2017, I am currently busy working on two more novels.

Links

Website: https://www.tonyjforder.com

Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Bad-Bone-Tony-J-Forder-ebook/dp/B071KTJJBH

Twitter: https://twitter.com/TonyJForder

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tonyjforder

Blog Tour – Kill Me Twice by Simon Booker *Review and Author Influences*

After really enjoying Simon Booker’s debut thriller Without Trace (read my review HERE), the first in the Morgan Vine series, I was eager to read the next book in the series. I’m really chuffed, therefore, to be on the blog tour for this much anticipated second novel, Kill Me Twice. Not only do I have my review but Simon has also taken part in my Author Influences feature for today’s blog tour post.

The Blurb

Karl Savage is dead.
He must be. His ex, Anjelica, is in prison for murdering him in an arson attack. Multiple forensic experts testified to finding his charred remains.
So when Anjelica begs investigative journalist Morgan Vine to prove her innocence, it seems an impossible task. It doesn’t matter that Karl was abusive. That Anjelica has a baby to care for. That she’s petrified of fire. The whole world knows Karl is dead.
Then he turns up outside Morgan’s window . . .

My Thoughts

Kill Me Twice is the second in the Morgan Vine series following on from Booker’s debut thriller Without Trace. I really enjoyed the first book and really looked forward to this one. While I have the benefit of having read the previous book in the series, Kill Me Twice stands up as a novel that can be read on its own.

What really appealed to me about this series is the fact that Morgan is an investigative journalist rather than a detective which gives this series a different slant and it, therefore, comes from a different perspective. In Kill Me Twice we meet with Morgan following the success of her book Trial and Error: A History of Miscarriages of Justice as she is setting herself up to help those who have been wrongfully convicted. This leads her to assist in the case of Anjelica Fry, a mother currently in prison for the murder of her partner and baby’s father Karl Savage. But is Karl Savage actually dead?

Booker has created great characters for this series. Morgan is an independent, tenacious single mother who will not give up on what she believes to be the truth even when those around her doubt her. Lissa her twenty-year-old daughter again plays a large part in this book. I’m not keen on Lissa, she is not particularly likeable and comes across as a bit of a spoilt brat although I sense a vulnerability about her that I don’t yet fully understand. This adds to the series in that it gives you a contrast of characters and Lissa, while I don’t like her, would be a miss as she adds to the trouble that Morgan faces and I feel that there is more to learn about her.

I always like it when we gain an insight into the antagonist and the writer gives them depth making them a fully rounded character. Booker has written the character of Karl Savage in such a way that while he is utterly despicable you understand why and how he ended up being this way and at points I did feel a degree of sympathy for him. This adds an additional layer to Kill Me Twice.

Kill Me Twice took me on a journey I really wasn’t expecting, I had read the blurb (and actually remembered what the synopsis of the book was, which is pretty amazing for me!) and, I guess, I was expecting a certain plot direction. Kill Me Twice’s trajectory ended up being far, far removed from the average storyline. While Morgan expects to be assisting in a miscarriage of justice case her relationship with Anjelica ends up in her discovering a seedy underground business that relies on vulnerable women to propel it forward and, ultimately, becomes very personal.

Booker’s use of short, punchy sentences in the first chapter are incredibly effective in building up tension, a sense of unease and ensures that the atmosphere and tone of the book is set. You just know that Booker is going to take you to some dark places.

A complex story that is well written and well plotted, Kill Me Twice takes you on one hell of a ride. The ending shocked me and had me muttering ‘oh my God’ to the book. A deliciously dark read that has me eagerly awaiting the third in the series.

Published on 24 August 2017 by Bonnier Zaffre.

Simon now takes over to tell you about his author influences.

Which authors/books did you like to read as a child?
I was hooked on Sherlock Holmes from the age of 10.

Were you good at English at school? Did you like it?
My ‘best’ subject. I wrote and performed plays too, which gave me my first taste of applause. Been hooked ever since.

What genres do you like to read? Have they had an impact on the genre you write?
I read a lot of crime but it can become a busman’s holiday.

If you were to write a different genre what would it be and why?
I’ve written rom coms for TV (as well as crime), including Perfect Strangers starring Rob Lowe and Anna Friel. A good rom com is a work of genius, but they’re few and far between, eg, When Harry Met Sally and The Apartment.

Did any author’s work encourage you to pick up your pen and write and if so who, what and why?
Conan Doyle, for the reason above.

Are there any authors who, as soon as they publish a new book, you have to get it?
Sarah Waters is unmissable.

Which books have you read that have made you think ’Wow, I wish I had written that’ and what was it about the book?
More films than books (see above). If I could have written When Harry Met Sally, Little Miss Sunshine or Sideways I would die a happy man.

Have any of your plots/characters been influenced by real life events/people? (Be careful, I don’t want you getting sued!)
My heroine Morgan Vine is obsessed by miscarriages of justice, and so am I. True story: my ex wife is now married to a man who spend 26 years in a US prison for a murder he didn’t commit.

Thank you for taking part Simon!

You can get a FREE Morgan Vine short story and find out more about my books Kill Me Twice and Without Trace at simonbooker.com

Follow me on Twitter @simonbooker

A huge thank you to Simon Booker and Imogen at Bonnier Zaffre for the advance copy and for inviting me to take part in the blog tour.

Follow the rest of the tour…

 

Author Influences with Anita Waller

Psychological thriller writer Anita Waller joins me today to talk about the books and authors that have influenced her life and writing.

Which authors/books did you like to read as a child?
Enid Blyton. I am currently re-reading her ‘Adventure’ series – Sea of Adventure, Circus of Adventure etc. I loved all her books.

Were you good at English at school? Did you like it?
Loved it, and always top marks. It started in my primary school, and continued all my life. I eventually took my A level in English when I was 42!

What genres do you like to read? Have they had an impact on the genre you write?
Psychological thrillers, horror, supernatural. I write psychological thrillers as a rule, but I have written one supernatural, Winterscroft.

If you were to write a different genre what would it be and why?
I don’t think I could because murder would creep into it, whatever it may have started out as!

Did any author’s work encourage you to pick up your pen and write and if so who, what and why?
No, the need to write has been there for always. I clearly remember attempting to write novels when I was only eight years old. I did attempt to write romance, and I actually have six romance novels already written, but I was always looking for a way to bring crime into them, and that’s when I realised I was writing in the wrong genre. Now I am happy!

Are there any authors who, as soon as they publish a new book, you have to get it?
J D Robb, Camilla Lackberg, and, until his death, Henning Mankell. And Stephen King, of course (that goes without saying).

Which books have you read that have made you think ’Wow, I wish I had written that’ and what was it about the book?
The Hidden Island, by Angela Corner. The descriptive passages are superb, and the location sounds awesome. I loved this book. The plotline, although brilliant, was almost secondary to the quality of the writing, and as I finished it I immediately thought, I wish I had written that.

Have any of your plots/characters been influenced by real life events/people? (Be careful, I don’t want you getting sued!)
My current WIP is based on a true-life story told to me. I am changing things to protect the innocents (me) but it’s a fantastic storyline.

A huge thank you Anita for taking part. 

Anita’s latest book Strategy was published on 31 July 2017 by Bloodhound Books. Here is what it’s about…

How much can one family take? 

Jenny Carbrook murdered three people to make it look as though there was a serial killer at work in Lincoln, when the only person she wanted to kill was Ray Carbrook, her father-in-law, who had raped her the week before her marriage to Mark, Ray’s son.

Jenny wrote letters detailing her crimes in order to protect everyone she loved, but was forced to go into hiding before retrieving the evidence against her.  Not only did she leave the letters behind but also her young daughter, Grace.

Now Jenny has a plan, a strategy, to get the letters back. But it’s not only the letters that Jenny has in her sights…

About Anita Waller

My name is Anita Waller, and I was born in Sheffield, UK, way back in 1946. I have been married for just over fifty years to Dave, and we have produced three amazing children, all now grown up and flown.
I have always written and my first published book, Beautiful, was taken on by Bloodhound Books and launched in August, 2015. It soon became apparent that I needed to write a sequel, and so Angel was launched in May, 2016. I had already started writing 34 Days immediately after Beautiful, but put it to one side until I completed Angel. I then resurrected it, and 34 Days launched in October 2016. This was a massive seller, particularly in the United States. In the UK it reached 26 in the top 100 paid charts.
By this time, I was already re-writing a lost manuscript I wrote back in 1990 or thereabouts, so I completed Winterscroft and Bloodhound launched it in February 2017. Number five is now about to be launched, and it is the much-requested sequel to 34 Days, called Strategy. This will be released on 10 August 2017. It has been an amazing two years with the publication of five books.
I have now started my sixth book, as yet unnamed, and still in the psychological thriller genre.
I write about murder, necessary murder.

Website: www.anitamayw.wixsite.com/anitawaller

Twitter: @anitamayw

Facebook: @anitawaller2015

Amazon: www.amazon.co.uk/Anita-Waller/e/B014RQFCRS/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1496767924&sr=8-2-ent

 

Author Influences with Jack Steele

Joining me for this week’s Author Influences is crime thriller novelist Jack Steele. Grab a cuppa and be prepared for your TBR list to grow as Jack tells us about his favourite authors and books.

Hi Abbie, thanks for the invite, it’s great to be here! 

Which authors/books did you like to read as a child?
Roald Dahl was a favourite author of mine. The two books I really loved were James and the Giant Peach and Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. I would read these over and over again.
I enjoyed the ‘Peanuts’ collection of books by Charles M Shultz eager to read every one of the cartoon stories involving Charlie Brown, Snoopy and the gang.
The frequent visits to the library meant that other books that were temporary occupants on my shelf were The Cat in the Hat by Dr Suess, The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S.Lewis, The Railway Children by E.Nesbit and The Hobbit by J.R.R.Tolkien.

Were you good at English at school? Did you like it?
Yes, I loved it. I have a vivid imagination probably due to growing up as an only child. I would read all the time and make up my own stories. If only I hadn’t lost them! Just to be able to reminisce on my thoughts back then.
My English Teacher, Bernard Phillips, was able to add drama to the readings in his class. He would encourage us to emphasis the sentences especially those written by Shakespeare. That’s why The Merchant of Venice is such a favourite of mine and had such an impact on my writing. Through the eyes of Shylock, what he wanted was justified, but to everyone else it was an outrage.
The final scene of my crime thriller Long Shot has the perpetrator of the crimes justifying their actions to Detective Joe Stone who is trying to come to terms with the events and the person who did them.

What genres do you like to read? Have they had an impact on the genre you write?
I enjoy most genres – comedy, science fiction, horror, dystopian, supernatural, dark fantasy but crime thrillers are my favourite. I started to read the Alex Cross series by James Patterson and found them an easy read with short chapters and this style of writing had an impact on my style. Fast – paced page turners with cliff hangers, moral dilemmas and believable characters.

If you were to write a different genre what would it be and why?
I have a few unfinished stories which are dystopian. Set in modern day but with events about to turn for the worst. It was mainly about fending for oneself when all about you is falling to pieces.
I have always had dreams/nightmares about being chased or I am doing the chasing! Probably watching too many movies/ TV programmes like The Walking Dead, Resident Evil, Divergent, Mad Max and I am Legend.

Did any author’s work encourage you to pick up your pen and write and if so who, what and why?
Definitely James Patterson focused my attention to writing crime thrillers. I had the stories rattling around in my head for what seemed an age but I never found the time to sit down and write! When I watched a few TV programmes that were vaguely similar to my stories it was then that I decided to write not one but a series of books, providing the response was there! Thankfully I was encouraged to write the sequel and now I have the first draft of book 3 down!

Are there any authors who, as soon as they publish a new book, you have to get it?
James Patterson obviously but I have also started to read his Women’s Murder Club stories as well.
I have the good fortune to meet up with other authors at events like Harrogate’s Crime Festival and other local get-togethers. I really enjoy reading Barbara Copperthwaite, Tara Lyons, K.L.Slater and Shalini Boland books.

Which books have you read that have made you think ’Wow, I wish I had written that’ and what was it about the book?
That has to be Brighton Rock by Grahame Greene. I loved the gangster element and all the characters in the book. When the ending had a twist that was the moment I thought Wow!

Have any of your plots/characters been influenced by real life events/people? (Be careful, I don’t want you getting sued!)
Thankfully no Abbie!
I had sent ARC’s to my reading group and readers who enjoyed my debut novel Loose Cannon. A few weeks later as the great reviews were coming in, I read in a Sunday Newspaper article that the government was considering forming a new anti-terrorist unit. This was one of the themes in Long Shot and despite being a work of fiction, parts of it could actually become fact.

A huge thank you Jack for taking part. I really enjoyed reading your responses!

 

The first two Detective Joe Stone novels Loose Cannon and Long Shot are out now! Here’s what they are about …

Loose Cannon

Detective Joe Stone has worked hard to reduce crime in and around London’s East End. The London Mafia had been instrumental in the operation; but is now being targeted by a serial killer. Stone is in a race against time to find and stop the psychopath before a gangland civil war breaks out.

Amazon.co.uk
Amazon.com

Long Shot

Detective Joe Stone and his team investigate a major terrorist attack on one of London’s most iconic buildings. They soon draw up a list of suspects who are highly respected members of the community and government. When most of his team is attacked, it soon develops into a war of nerves and a race against time before a deadly weapon is unleashed with horrific consequences.

Amazon.co.uk
Amazon.com

About Jack Steele

I was born in Hackney, London and grew up on the Bannister House Housing Estate in Hommerton. I now live in Nottinghamshire and married with two grown up children who now have lives of their own, leaving me time to indulge in my favourite passions, reading and writing. I still work full-time in the printing industry which is where I have been for the past 40 years. On many occasions it interferes with my writing, working extra hours or weekends, so it can be a balancing act but one I seem to manage along with an understanding wife of course.

I spent five years researching books, magazines, documentaries, movies and internet articles on various subjects as well as completing a creative writing course and attending workshops run by the Nottingham Writers Studio.

It was a great achievement in 2016 when I published my first Crime Thriller novel Loose Cannon with great reviews. It was the first in the Detective Joe Stone series and I was encouraged to write the sequel Long Shot which is due for publication on July 29th 2017.

My writing style is a fast-paced page turner with cliff hangers, moral dilemmas and believable characters.

I would like to thank all my readers, editors, bloggers and Crime book club friends who like you Abbie have been so supportive through this process. Your encouragement drives me on to write the next book in the series.

Aww Jack, it’s a pleasure!

Website: http://www.jacksteeleauthor.com/
Social Media sites:
Facebook: Jack.steele.31508
Twitter: JackSteele1961
Instagram: Jack_steele1

Blog Tour – Broken Branches by M. Jonathan Lee *Review and Author Influences*

I am really excited to be taking part in the blog tour for M. Jonathan Lee’s Broken Branches today, sharing my review AND Jonathan’s Author Influences. I adored this beautiful book which is published Hideaway Fall … judging by the quality of their first publication, Hideaway Fall have an exciting future ahead of them!

The Blurb

‘Family curses don’t exist. Sure, some families seem to suffer more pain than others, but a curse? An actual curse? I don’t think so.’

A family tragedy was the catalyst for Ian Perkins to return to the isolated cottage with his wife and young son. But now they are back, it seems yet more grief might befall the family.

There is still time to act, but that means Ian must face the uncomfortable truth about his past. And in doing so, he must uncover the truth behind the supposed family curse.

My Thoughts

Oh my goodness, where to start with this review? An inheritance, a marriage on the rocks and a curse all combined with gorgeous writing make Broken Branches a beautiful and emotional read.

I was completely swept along by the first chapter in which we first meet the main character, Ian Perkins, and his property Cobweb Cottage. We learn of a family tragedy that has resulted in Ian and his family moving into the cottage and also a possible inherited curse. With gorgeous descriptions of the cottage and the imposing Sycamore tree that stands outside the front of the house Broken Branches promises an intriguing, somewhat gothic, tale and it continues to deliver.

Ian is an interesting character who is trying to prove that the curse his family have talked about through the generations exists. We meet him in the midst of his failing marriage to Rachel and, for a reason of which we are unaware, Ian believes that establishing there really is a curse on the Perkins family will save his relationship. Broken Branches is told largely from Ian’s perspective; switching between the present day in which he is completing his genealogical research and his childhood growing up in the cottage he is again inhabiting. I was really touched by his teenage experiences – his sense of loneliness, the difference in the way he is treated compared to his older brother and the difficulties in his relationship with his family members – and his love of reading resonated with me, bringing back memories of my own worn and underlined copies of Wuthering Heights and Tess of the D’Urbervilles. Ian’s desperation in his search for the truth about his family grows and becomes more apparent as Broken Branches unfurls. I was with Ian throughout his journey and felt his emotions and sense of urgency.

Punctuated with brief glimpses of Rachel’s point of view later in the book, the reader begins to question Ian’s version of events adding to the captivation of the novel. This really enhanced my interest in the story that was unfolding.

Broken Branches has a quietly disconcerting feel to it which stays with the reader throughout the course of the book. There are a few seemingly supernatural elements that send delicate shivers down your spine. Lee’s prose is stunning and he uses nature to maximum effect to create atmosphere. The ominous Sycamore tree plays a large part and that, along with the other references to nature, gives it that gothic feel I spoke about at the beginning of the review. The imagery Lee presents gives Broken Branches a thoughtful perspective and an added layer that is compelling and irresistible.

Part mystery, part gothic novel Broken Branches is a gorgeous book about grief and guilt that will stay with me for a long time. Simply wonderful!

Published on 27 July 2017 by Hideaway Fall Publishing.

A huge thank you to M.Jonathan Lee and Hideaway Fall for my advance copy in exchange for my review and to Midas PR for inviting me to take part in the blog tour.

I will now hand you over to Jonathan to tell you about his author influences.

Which authors/books did you like to read as a child?
Roald Dahl was and always has been my favourite. I love everything that he has written. I read the short stories and Unexpected Tales over and over again.

Were you good at English at school? Did you like it?
It was by far my best subject. As a ten year old I was sent to the headmaster for writing a story where the lead protagonist met his end half way through the story and a second character became the main character. I was told that type of writing was inappropriate.

What genres do you like to read? Have they had an impact on the genre you write?
I read a lot of true crime. I am an obsessed with what makes somebody do something horrific to another human being, though I don’t like reading any of the actual grisly details. I read anything that interests me though, and usually switch between fact and fiction. I do think that it has an impact on my novels. I actually think that everything around me in life has a tiny input into what I read.

If you were to write a different genre what would it be and why?
I hate sci-fi. Anything that ‘couldn’t happen’ in real life is not my thing. However, I do have this crazy sci-fi idea about a company that trades in death which comes to the forefront of my mind from time to time. Maybe I’ll write it one day.

Did any author’s work encourage you to pick up your pen and write and if so who, what and why?
I think Mark Haddon and Joseph Connolly had the biggest impact. A Spot of Bother and Summer Things respectively.

Are there any authors who, as soon as they publish a new book, you have to get it?
Not really. I’m the same with music. I am obsessed and there are numerous bands I adore, but I tend to buy books and music when the mood takes me as opposed to waiting for something to come out. I’m a massive Stephen King fan, and haven’t read anything by him for about five years. Last week, I suddenly thought “I fancy some Stephen King,” and went online and bought four recent novels. I’ve read three.

Which books have you read that have made you think ’Wow, I wish I had written that’ and what was it about the book?
Ha. So many times. Misery sticks in my mind as one.

Have any of your plots/characters been influenced by real life events/people? (Be careful, I don’t want you getting sued!)
Yes absolutely. I observe everything around me and I am always taking note of little snippets of conversations or mannerisms that I hear. So in that sense all my books have a bit of reality in them. A Tiny Feeling of Fear (my third novel) is very personal to me, and there is more in there which reflects reality than people may think. I’d recommend people watching my documentary short, Hidden (on YouTube) for more information.

Thank you Jonathan for taking part!

About M. Jonathan Lee

M. Jonathan Lee is based in Yorkshire and is the author of several award-nominated novels. He began writing seriously in 2006 shortly after the suicide of his brother, Simon, who had been struggling with depression. Jonathan is a tireless campaigner for mental health awareness. He has written for Mind and Rethink charities and has a regular blog on the Huffington Post. He is divorced and now remarried, between them they have five children, two cats and a dog.

Twitter: @MJonathanLee

Follow the rest of the tour…

Author Influences with Terry Tyler

I’m extremely delighted to welcome author  Terry Tyler to Bloomin’ Brilliant Books today to find out about her favourite books and authors in this weeks Author Influences … and it’s a brilliant one!

 

Which authors/books did you like to read as a child?
I’m pretty much the same as everyone else, I’m afraid—Enid Blyton (yes, yes, The Magic Faraway Tree, though I preferred Mallory Towers!), the Jill pony books by Ruby Ferguson, the Narnia series. I read a lot; my parents took us to the library every Saturday to change our books. Saturday afternoons were spent lying on my bed reading, with a quarter pound of pear drops, bought with my (seven old pennies) pocket money. Bliss. The simple pleasures of the 1960s childhood! I haven’t changed that much: all I need is a great book and a pile of pillows, and I’m happy. I do without the sweets these days, though. Mostly ;).

Were you good at English at school? Did you like it?
Very, I always got top marks. I loved it. Mind you, it was about the only thing I did love. School and me were not a great fit.

What genres do you like to read? Have they had an impact on the genre you write?
My favourite books to read are post apocalyptic and historical fiction, and I do love stories about long, treacherous journeys, with maybe the odd murder and psychopath. Stories set up mountains, in cold, barren wastelands, the remote places of America, Australia, the Arctic Circle, etc. Histfic wise, I prefer those with battles and struggle, conspiracies, and triumph over dangerous situations. My favourite eras are Plantagenet, Tudor and the Civil War/Restoration. I love zombie books, but they have to be really well written and not just blood and gore. I’ll read contemporary UK based dramas, if they’re edgy and psychologically realistic. Mark Barry, in particular. And I’ve recently read some great ‘lad lit’ by Andrew Webber. I’m a fan of a good travel memoir, too. Oh dear, you’ve made me want to list all my favourite books, now…!

As for the impact on what I write, I’ve read Susan Howatch’s historical sagas over and over, and they’ve influenced how I structure some of my books (mostly the family sagas). Her books made me understand that aspects of a character’s story can best be told from the point of view of another; sometimes, an astute third party observation can say so much more.

Reading post apocalyptic books (and watching TV series and films of this type) made me long to write in the genre myself, especially when combined with my interest in how the media influences the masses, sociological trends, and the way in which hard times can bring out the good and the evil within man. I hope that doesn’t sound too vague and disjointed! I’m writing a series, and it’s the hardest thing I’ve ever done.

If you were to write a different genre what would it be and why?
Historical fiction, because I love to immerse myself in the past (and have a great interest in the way that comparisons can be made with later eras) but the authors I admire are so fabulously good at what they do that I’m not sure I could write something of a high enough standard; getting the research absolutely right is pretty daunting, and the mark has been set very high by my favourites.

Did any author’s work encourage you to pick up your pen and write and if so who, what and why?
No, no one in particular. I think the creative urge was just there, from early on. I’ve been writing stuff for many years. I’m sure I wrote stories as a child; I remember doing so in my twenties. I wrote one for each sign of the zodiac. I bet they were awful; I’m glad I haven’t still got them!

Are there any authors who, as soon as they publish a new book, you have to get it?
Loads. Here’s a list:

Dylan Morgan (horror, scifi, post apocalyptic)
Deborah Swift (17th century history)
Gemma Lawrence (Tudor history)
Jon Krakauer (non-fiction; all sorts)
John Boyne (assorted history)
Carol Hedges (Victorian Murder)
William Savage (18th Century Murder)
John Privilege (post apocalyptic, if he’d write another)
Kate Mary (zombies)
Blake Crouch (horror/thriller)
Frank Tayell (zombies)
Ann Swinfen (if she will write some more 17th century history!)
Mark Barry (contemporary drama)
Bill Bryson (no description needed)
Jo Carroll (travel memoir)
Val Poore (travel memoir)

There are other writers such as Kate Atkinson, Douglas Kennedy, Deborah Moggach, Keith Blackmore and Emily Barr whose books I’ve read all or nearly all of, but I’ve discovered so many new writers in the last few years that it’s hard to keep up with all my favourites.

Which books have you read that have made you think ’Wow, I wish I had written that’ and what was it about the book?
Cashelmara by Susan Howatch. It’s a wonderful historical family saga, set in the early-mid 19th century, that takes the characters through privilege and wealth, to loss of status and disaster, from London society to the potato famine in Ireland, from loss and degradation to grand passion. I think if I’d written that book I’d just sit and look at it every day and think, “Yes, that’s me. I wrote that book. Wow!”

Other that that, I think I’d die happy if I’d written Call of the Wild by Jack London, Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, Something in Disguise by Elizabeth Jane Howard, and Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K Jerome. Simply because they’re perfect pieces of literature.

Have any of your plots/characters been influenced by real life events/people? (Be careful, I don’t want you getting sued!)
Not whole plots, but parts within them. I got the idea for Best Seller, my novella about three writers, because a former friend submitted something of which I’d written 80% to a literary agent, and pretended she was the sole author (I’d based it around some of her ideas and notes). It wouldn’t have come to light if the agent hadn’t been offering representation; my former friend then had to try to get me to write the rest of it without letting me speak to the agent, at which point I began to smell a rat! But it made me think about why someone would be so desperate to gain kudos as a writer that they’d pass off someone else’s work as their own. That’s seriously messed up, isn’t it?!

Aside from this, there are many situations in my novels that come directly from real life, often mine or my sister’s (she recognises them!), emotions taken from experiences of my own or those to whom I am close, though I tend not to base characters on people I know, so much. I just take some aspects of them, now and again. But not anyone who is likely to read anything I’ve written. At least, I hope not…!

A huge thank you Terry for taking part and for the brilliant answers, I really enjoyed reading this. I must bump Call of the Wild up my TBR pile, it has been waiting on my Kindle to be read for ages. Oh my God! I can’t believe your ‘friend’ did that!!!

Terry’s latest book The Devil You Know is out now and you can read my review HERE.

Every serial killer is someone’s friend, spouse, lover or child….

Young women are being murdered in the Lincolnshire town of Lyndford, where five people fear someone close to them might be the monster the police are searching for.
One of them is right.

Juliet sees an expert’s profile of the average serial killer and realises that her abusive husband, Paul, ticks all the boxes.

Maisie thinks her mum’s new boyfriend seems too good to be true. Is she the only person who can see through Gary’s friendly, sensitive façade?

Tamsin is besotted with her office crush, Jake. Then love turns to suspicion…

Steve is used to his childhood friend, Dan, being a loud mouthed Lothario with little respect for the truth. But is a new influence in his life leading him down a more sinister path?

Dorothy’s beloved son, Orlando, is keeping a secret from her—a chilling discovery forces her to confront her worst fears.

THE DEVIL YOU KNOW is a character-driven psychological drama that will keep you guessing until the very end.

About Terry Tyler

Terry Tyler’s first Amazon publication, ‘You Wish’, won Best Women’s Fiction in the eFestival of Words 2013, while short story collection ‘Nine Lives’, family dramas ‘Last Child’ and ‘The House of York’, and psychological drama/thriller ‘The Devil You Know’ have won other small online awards or been named on book bloggers’ ‘Best Books of the Year’ posts.

Her next book, Tipping Point, is expected to be published in August 2017. It’s the first part of a trilogy, about a how one family and group of friends survive a global pandemic. The second book, Lindisfarne, should be out in September.

Terry has a blog on which she writes around many topics (social networking, writing, TV, general comment). The link: http://www.terrytyler59.blogspot.co.uk/ . She also has a book review blog, on which you can find her own reading choices and those she reads as part of Rosie Amber’s Book Review Team. She loves Twitter (TerryTyler4) and can also be found on Goodreads and Facebook.

Terry lives in the north east of England with her husband.

Connect with Terry

Twitter: @TerryTyler4

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5821157.Terry_Tyler

Author Influences with Mike Thomas

I’m thrilled to have Mike Thomas join me today for this week’s edition of Author Influences. Unforgivable, the second in the DC Will Macready series is out on 27 July 2017 and I’m excited to be taking part in the blog tour at the beginning of August. I will now hand you over to Mike…

Which authors/books did you like to read as a child?
The books I remember enjoying when I was very young were by Richard Scarry. From there it was Enid Blyton, and in my early teens I became hooked on horror and fantasy, devouring writers like James Herbert, Stephen King and Robert R. McCammon. The first horror book I was ever given was called Plague Pit by Mark Ronson. It had this amazing, pulpy tone and the cover was of a mildewed skull with one eyeball peering at you. I think I was about ten years old and the book fascinated me but scared the bejesus out of me, too. From that point – seeing how these authors could affect you so profoundly just via words on a page – I knew I wanted to be a writer.

Were you good at English at school? Did you like it?
I always leaned towards the creative side of things at school. This is another way of saying I was unimaginably awful at mathematics and the sciences, to the point where I’d skip double algebra to go into town and hide in a café and play on their Space Invader machine (which was, technically, science). I thoroughly enjoyed English and art subjects. I studied English Language and Literature, and flourished under one of the teachers. She was incredibly inspiring and really pushed us to create – short stories, poems, novel chapters – and to read a broad range of genres. Was I good at English? I really don’t know. I’m making a living from writing in it now, so I suppose I was okay!

What genres do you like to read? Have they had an impact on the genre you write?
I was a police officer for over two decades and made a point of avoiding crime novels. Now I’m writing them, so have had to play catch up in the last few years and I’m really enjoying it. I read Sarah Hilary’s Someone Else’s Skin while writing my new novel and I must say it made me raise my game. It’s a superb book and I love her protagonist DI Marnie Rome. Most of the time it’s work by the likes of Denis Johnson, Tobias Wolff and Chuck Palahniuk, or relatively new kids on the block like Donald Ray Pollock and Frank Bill. So-called American ‘transgressive fiction’. But I’ll read anything. Fiction, non-fiction, poetry, the label on the back of a jar of pickles. I just love to read.

If you were to write a different genre what would it be and why?
Some kind of non-fiction travel work. I’ve been about, and live in Portugal now, and one of my ‘other writing jobs’ has involved travel articles. Perhaps humorous fiction. Probably because I think I’m hilarious. My wife would, quite rightly, disagree.

Did any author’s work encourage you to pick up your pen and write and if so who, what and why?
I refer you to question one. Stephen King was a huge influence. As I was discovering books in the early Eighties he was already a literary superstar, and pretty much everywhere. I burned through Carrie, Salem’s Lot and The Shining, but It sealed it for me; I was fourteen when I took on that doorstopper and loved every page. Pennywise the clown, man. Scary.

Are there any authors who, as soon as they publish a new book, you have to get it?
Cormac McCarthy. Dan Rhodes – I love his work. For crime it’s usually the big guns: Connelly, Rankin, Billingham and so on. And I have a soft spot for American author John Sandford.

Which books have you read that have made you think ’Wow, I wish I had written that’ and what was it about the book?
Anything by Cormac McCarthy. I think The Road is a masterpiece. Grim and troubling and occasionally very difficult, following the father and son as they walk the ashen world, but ultimately hugely moving.

Have any of your plots/characters been influenced by real life events/people? (Be careful, I don’t want you getting sued!)
I’ve used quite a few events from my time in the police. Tweaked them here and there, of course, to fit the story. Many real life incidents I would never use, simply because people will think they are too far-fetched. You’d be surprised at what goes on out there! And as for real people? Nope. I’m a writer, therefore cannot afford to pay enormous out of court settlements!

A huge thank you for taking part Mike, I really enjoyed reading your answers.

Mike’s next novel Unforgivable is out on 27 July 2017.

The Blurb

Bombs detonate in a busy souk, causing massive devastation.
An explosion rips apart a mosque, killing and injuring those inside.
But this isn’t the Middle East – this is Cardiff . . .

In a city where tensions are already running high, DC Will MacReady and his colleagues begin the desperate hunt for the attacker. If they knew the ‘why’, then surely they can find the ‘who’? But that isn’t so easy, and time is fast running out . . .

MacReady is still trying to prove himself after the horrific events of the previous year, which left his sergeant injured and his job in jeopardy, so he feels sidelined when he’s asked to investigate a vicious knife attack on a young woman.

But all is not as it seems with his new case, and soon MacReady must put everything on the line in order to do what is right.

Ash and Bones, the first in the DC Macready is out now … if you missed it you can read my review HERE.

About Mike Thomas

Mike Thomas was born in Wales in 1971. For more than two decades he served in the police, working some of Cardiff ’s busiest neighbourhoods in uniform, public order units, drugs teams and CID. He left the force in 2015 to write full time.

His debut novel, Pocket Notebook, was published by William Heinemann (Penguin Random House) and longlisted for the Wales Book of the Year. The author was also named as one of Waterstones’ ‘New Voices’ for 2010. His second novel, Ugly Bus, is currently in development for a six part television series with the BBC.

The first in the MacReady series of novels, Ash and Bones, was released August 2016 by Bonnier Zaffre. Unforgivable, the second in the series, is released in July 2017.

He lives in the wilds of Portugal with his wife and two children.

Website: https://mikethomasauthor.co.uk/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/ItDaFiveOh?lang=en

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MikeThomasAuthor

Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5895620.Mike_Thomas